Jay Paloma's Tech and Music Blog

Sometimes, this writer can no longer distinguish between the two.

Posts Tagged ‘Windows 10

Windows 10 Time Service Assigns Wrong Time

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4 August 2016. Currently banging my head on this issue. Will update this post once I find a solution. The picture flow is from the upper left picture then go clockwise.

Picture 1 shows correct time. Then just to be sure I synced the time with the domain (#2), which shows confirmation (#3), but when I started the Windows Time Service (#4), the time changes to the wrong date and time, which is probably the date and time when I built this VM.

Environment: Hyper-V guest with SCVMM. Guest is NOT synchronizing with the Hyper-V host. I have 3 Windows 10 machines on two separate Hyper-V hosts displaying the same behavior, which rules out the Hyper-V host.

 

 

UPDATE
Since it’s the Windows Time service that, for some reason, reverts the clock to its build date and time, then shutting down and disabling the service ensures that the date and time are in the last correct setting.

Caveat: you have to manually sync time by issuing the following command from an elevated Command Prompt: net time /domain /set /yes

Written by jpaloma

August 4, 2016 at 9:57 AM

Posted in Windows 10

Tagged with ,

MVPs Sharing their Experiences during the Philippines’ Windows 10 Community Event

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MVPs (from L to R) John Delizo, Jay-R Barrios, Jay Paloma, Yvette Watson and Eufer Pasion share their experiences as MVPs during the Windows 10 Community Event in the Philippines

MVPs (from L to R) John Delizo, Jay-R Barrios, Jay Paloma, Adrian Rodriguez, Yvette Watson and Eufer Pasion share their experiences as MVPs during the Windows 10 Community Event in the Philippines

During the Windows 10 Community Event organized by the Philippine Windows Users Group (PHIWUG) and Microsoft Philippines.

Since the MVP is a recognition which candidates get nominated by another MVP or by Microsoft, one of the questions asked is in the lines of what do you think were you doing that warranted a nomination for MVP? It was noticeable that one word was used by all MVPs in the panel: passion (to the delight of MVP Eufer Pasion). All MVPs are so passionate about Microsoft technology that they would be going through great lengths to share the technology over and above the call of duty, whether work or school. A common trait among MVPs is their sharing of these technologies online (via blogs or videos) or offline (via community events). The Philippine Windows Users Group, and the other Philippines’ Users Groups based on Microsoft technologies were all set up by passionate individuals which eventually were recognized by Microsoft as MVPs themselves.

Another question that was asked was if the MVP program actually made any career advantage. The overwhelming answer was Yes. This is simply because an MVP becomes an MVP not by one’s own efforts, but as a recognition by a separate party: Microsoft. Not only that, usually MVPs have an online presence like a blog, which is a testament to one’s technical expertise in itself.  Plus of course, an active community contributor is placed in a position of demonstrating the technologies in front of a live audience, a skill which would be useful later on as a consultant or an architect.

While all of the MVPs who participated in these events are Filipinos (entirely or partially), not all of them are currently Philippines MVPs. Jay-R Barrios and this author are Singapore MVPs by virtue of their residence since both are employed and live in Singapore. However, both became MVPs in the Philippines and were part of the team that formed PHIWUG. Both of us flew in back home for this event.

The last words for the attendees from the MVPs were to not want to become an MVP. Become passionate with the technology, go out and actively contribute to the technical community. Whether or not one becomes an MVP is Microsoft’s prerogative, but the other benefits of contributing to the community — the network, the reputation, learning directly from technology experts, and the soft skills learned like public speaking — is something that one can acquire when contributing.

Special thanks to all the MVPs who contributed to this discussion:

Written by jpaloma

June 29, 2015 at 11:31 AM

PHIWUG Presents – Windows 10 Unleashed

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JP PHIWUG

Thank you very much for attending this event PHIWUG Presents – Windows 10 Unleashed. It has been a pleasure for the Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals (MVP) and the Philippine Windows Users Group (PHIWUG) to provide words of inspiration to our future technology leaders.

From someone who works overseas, conducting events in Filipino and English means I think less and feel more. Which is why this afternoon’s session was special for me.

Thank you also to the leads of PHIWUG, and the Microsoft Philippines folks for your undying support. I look forward to sharing in more Community Events like this in the future.

 

Written by jpaloma

June 27, 2015 at 11:13 PM