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Archive for the ‘Hyper-V’ Category

“Does not support virtual hard disk sharing” Error when moving Hyper-V VMs

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Error Message:

“The storage where the virtual hard disk is locaed does not support virtual hard disk sharing” error when creating VMs or moving VMs from one Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V host to another (unclustered). These two machines are managed by System Center Virtual Machine Manager, but I am trying to test VM Migration from the Hyper-V Console because it kept failing in SCVMM.

VMM Does not support virtual hard disk sharing

My Resolution

Stop mucking around with the Hyper-V console when it is be part of SCVMM! Because I turned on the Replication feature (not sure if there is an SCVMM counterpart for this), migration stopped working. So the resolution is disable the Replication feature.

Turn off replication

Good old patience and troubleshooting!

I did not find any published resolution to this problem and am already contemplating on rebuilding the lab. Importing VMs also did not work (exporting did work on the two hosts that are a member of SCVMM). I tested importing on a HV host that is not part of SCVMM — it worked! I compared the settings and the difference was that I enabled the two HV servers in SCVMM as Replica Servers. Once I switched off this feature in Hyper-V and tested Migration in HV Console, everything worked.

I am now testing migrating using SCVMM. I will update this post on the results. It’s already 1AM in Singapore and I had a long day.

NEXT DAY UPDATE: successful VM movement using SCVMM. Problem has really been solved. Have a nice day!

jay paloma  |  27 apr 2016  | singapore

Information is provided “AS-IS” and makes no warranties and confers no rights.

 

Written by jpaloma

April 27, 2016 at 12:53 AM

Posted in Hyper-V, SCVMM

Tagged with , ,

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) with Hyper-V and Citrix

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During last week’s System Center Universe Asia Pacific, there was a question raised during the Ask the Experts portion on how Microsoft can address BYOD while ensuring that corporate security is still maintained, the Experts in the panel were not really able to address the required architecture.

I was formerly connected with Citrix, and right there I immediately thought of Citrix XenDesktop. However being in a Microsoft event I decided to keep my mouth shut and just decided to share the solution by writing about it. So here it is!

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Architecture

Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Architecture

The solution is to allow the personal devices to connect to VMs. These VMs are connected to the corporate network, while the personal devices are in some sort of protected network which is separate from the corporate network, and is only allowed to use the protocols necessary to allow the client to connect to the VMs.

Since the solution requires VMs. using Hyper-V is the way to go. No discussion here.

For this solution to work, there must be some technology that does VM provisioning. This is where the Citrix XenDesktop product comes in. You can dynamically provision VMs as needed.

The VMs can be shared VMs deployed with the same apps, or app deployment can be performed dynamically as the VM is being provisioned using either Citrix XenApp, or using Configuration Manager.

Just to be sure, some sort of health checking is prudent before the personal devices can be connected to the personal devices network. Also, they have to be enrolled to allow for authentication and encryption.

So does this solution work? Yes it does, and one great experience I had with Citrix is that BYOD and non domain joined devices are the norm!

Running Windows 8 on an iPad Mini with Citrix XenDesktop.

Running Windows 8 on an iPad Mini with Citrix XenDesktop.

Written by jpaloma

March 8, 2015 at 8:18 PM

Posted in Citrix, Hyper-V, Microsoft

First crack at Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012

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Due to a compelling and forced rebuild of my home/lab server, I installed Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012. It is, per my observation, a Windows Server 2012 Server Core with only the Hyper-V role installed. I have to say, it is very lightweight and has a very light footprint if one intends to build a server only for the hypervisor.

Advantages

  1. Lightweight, very quick installation compared to a full-blown Windows setup.
  2. Being lightweight also means I can pump in more machines in there than its predecessor, whose host OS already consumes some resources due to its full-blown Windows installation nature.
  3. Less Windows components installed means less patches and leaner attack surface.

 

However I was also presented with the following challenges

  1. Knowledge in remote administration and scripting is required to properly administer the server
  2. There is no consolidated remote administration tool from Microsoft. We are used to MMC, yes. But once you have experience working with other hypervisor products, one can’t help but notice that Microsoft has no consolidated tool to administer a Hyper-V Server Core. You will choose between command line commands, PowerShell scripting and MMC console, depending on the task (although this presents an opportunity for me to create a consolidated writeup on the matter).

 

High-level tasks needed in setting up your own Hyper-V Server 2012 are as follows:

  1. Setup the Hyper-V Server 2012
  2. Logon, enable Remote Adminsitration, and configure the server. Here there are tons of things needed to be done to be able to remotely administer the server, like enabling Windows Firewall rules, starting up services, etc. Remember – as long as it’s done on the server, either you use command prompt commands or Powershell scripts.
  3. Setup your remote administration client by adding the RSAT feature in Windows 7.
  4. Continue configuring the server from the remote administration tools.

More posts on configuration problems and solutions to follow. Meanwhile, here are some pics.

The initial Hyper-V Server 2012 installation screen. Although it looks like a typical Windows Server installation, it is a lot faster than its full-blown counterpart.

The initial Hyper-V Server 2012 installation screen. Although it looks like a typical Windows Server installation, it is a lot faster than its full-blown counterpart.

The Server Core console, after installation and logged on. There's a simple text-based menu for the initial tasks, but after this there's a lot more things needed to be done.

The Server Core console, after installation and logged on. There’s a simple text-based menu for the initial tasks, but after this there’s a lot more things needed to be done.

Here's what the logged off screen looks like.

Here’s what the logged off screen looks like.

 

One of my favorite features in this release is the dynamic memory provisioning capability. Guests can be allocated more (or less) memory depending on the availability.

One of my favorite features in this release is the dynamic memory provisioning capability. Guests can be allocated more (or less) memory depending on the availability.

 

jay paloma  |  9th jan 2012  |  singapore

Written by jpaloma

January 9, 2013 at 1:15 AM

Video: Microsoft Philippines Technet Session on Hyper-V

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This event was recorded on 12 May 2011 at Microsoft Philippines offices in Manila. Language used was predominantly Filipino and English.

In this session, we will take a look at Hyper-V of Windows Server 2008 R2 and how it will benefit your organization. Our speaker will also share with you his real-world experiences on planning for and deploying a virtualization environment, plus common practical scenarios in deploying a Hyper-V infrastructure.

Demonstrations include:

  • Hyper-V Implementation and Management Basics
  • Practical Applications of Virtualizing your infrastructure with Hyper-V
  • Using Microsoft Assessment and Planning Solution Accelerator to Assess your Environment

Speaker:
Jay Paloma, MCSE, MVP Enterprise Security
Consultant, Microsoft Services Singapore







Written by jpaloma

May 18, 2011 at 6:12 PM

MSPhil Community Event: Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V

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Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Hyper-V
Event ID: 1032480315
Exchange Room 16F 6750 Ayala Office Tower
6750 Ayala Avenue Makati Metro Manila 1200
Philippines

Starts: Thursday, May 12, 2011 6:00 PM
Ends: Thursday, May 12, 2011 8:00 PM
Time zone: (GMT+08:00) Singapore

Language(s): English.
Product(s): Windows Server 2008 R2.
Audience(s): IT Generalist.

In this session, we will take a look at Hyper-V of Windows Server 2008 R2 and how it will benefit your organization. Our speaker will also share with you his real-world experiences on planning for and deploying a virtualization environment, plus common practical scenarios in deploying a Hyper-V infrastructure.

Demonstrations include:

  • Hyper-V Implementation and Management Basics
  • Practical Applications of Virtualizing your infrastructure with Hyper-V
  • Using Microsoft Assessment and Planning Solution Accelerator to Assess your Environment

Speaker:

Jay Paloma
MCSE, MVP Enterprise Security
Consultant, Microsoft Services Singapore

Written by jpaloma

May 5, 2011 at 2:36 PM

Posted in Events, Hyper-V

Hyper-V Virtualization Stencils for Visio 2010

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For all of you IT Pro’s looking for virtualization stencils for Visio 2010, here’s a link I came across http://www.jonathancusson.com/tag/virtualization-stencil/. I’m using it in my current project and it looks good.

Written by jpaloma

April 14, 2011 at 1:41 PM

Posted in Hyper-V