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First crack at Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012

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Due to a compelling and forced rebuild of my home/lab server, I installed Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012. It is, per my observation, a Windows Server 2012 Server Core with only the Hyper-V role installed. I have to say, it is very lightweight and has a very light footprint if one intends to build a server only for the hypervisor.

Advantages

  1. Lightweight, very quick installation compared to a full-blown Windows setup.
  2. Being lightweight also means I can pump in more machines in there than its predecessor, whose host OS already consumes some resources due to its full-blown Windows installation nature.
  3. Less Windows components installed means less patches and leaner attack surface.

 

However I was also presented with the following challenges

  1. Knowledge in remote administration and scripting is required to properly administer the server
  2. There is no consolidated remote administration tool from Microsoft. We are used to MMC, yes. But once you have experience working with other hypervisor products, one can’t help but notice that Microsoft has no consolidated tool to administer a Hyper-V Server Core. You will choose between command line commands, PowerShell scripting and MMC console, depending on the task (although this presents an opportunity for me to create a consolidated writeup on the matter).

 

High-level tasks needed in setting up your own Hyper-V Server 2012 are as follows:

  1. Setup the Hyper-V Server 2012
  2. Logon, enable Remote Adminsitration, and configure the server. Here there are tons of things needed to be done to be able to remotely administer the server, like enabling Windows Firewall rules, starting up services, etc. Remember – as long as it’s done on the server, either you use command prompt commands or Powershell scripts.
  3. Setup your remote administration client by adding the RSAT feature in Windows 7.
  4. Continue configuring the server from the remote administration tools.

More posts on configuration problems and solutions to follow. Meanwhile, here are some pics.

The initial Hyper-V Server 2012 installation screen. Although it looks like a typical Windows Server installation, it is a lot faster than its full-blown counterpart.

The initial Hyper-V Server 2012 installation screen. Although it looks like a typical Windows Server installation, it is a lot faster than its full-blown counterpart.

The Server Core console, after installation and logged on. There's a simple text-based menu for the initial tasks, but after this there's a lot more things needed to be done.

The Server Core console, after installation and logged on. There’s a simple text-based menu for the initial tasks, but after this there’s a lot more things needed to be done.

Here's what the logged off screen looks like.

Here’s what the logged off screen looks like.

 

One of my favorite features in this release is the dynamic memory provisioning capability. Guests can be allocated more (or less) memory depending on the availability.

One of my favorite features in this release is the dynamic memory provisioning capability. Guests can be allocated more (or less) memory depending on the availability.

 

jay paloma  |  9th jan 2012  |  singapore

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Written by jpaloma

January 9, 2013 at 1:15 AM

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